Press for microtubule buckling in the heart!

2016

Our work on microtubules as molecular "struts" or "shock absorbers" in the beating heart has been featured in the popular press, and in the blog of NIH director Francis Collins. Check out a sampling below:
NIH director blog: https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2016/05/03/a-look-inside-a-beating-heart-cell/
Gizmodo: http://gizmodo.com/microscopic-tubes-inside-beating-heart-cells-work-like-1774530830
Business Insider: http://www.businessinsider.com/a-rare-view-inside-a-beating-heart-cell-2016-5


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Detyrosinated microtubules buckle and bear load in contracting cardiomyocytes

2016

Our work, in collaboration with folks in Engineering (Caporizzo, Shenoy groups) and Medicine (Margulies), shows that microtubules buckle and bear compressive load in a beating cardiomyocyte. The ability of microtubules to function as molecular shock absorbers is graded by "detyrosination", a post-translational modification of tubulin. Further, we found that detyrosination is increased in cardiomyopathy and correlates with functional decline in certain patient populations. The Prosser lab is actively investigating the efficacy of targeting detyrosination therapeutically to improve cardiac function in heart disease. Patrick Robison is the first author on this manuscript published in Science (a full text link is provided below).


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