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OUR TEAM

Maria Neimark Geffen, Ph.D.

Principal Investigator

BIO
EMAIL
C.V.

Katherine Wood, Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Fellow

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EMAIL

Melanie Tobin, Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Fellow

BIO
EMAIL

Alexandria Lesicko, Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Fellow

BIO
EMAIL

Nathan Vogler, Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Fellow

BIO
EMAIL

Janaki Sheth, Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Fellow

BIO
EMAIL

Linda Garami Ph.D.

Post-Doctoral Fellow

BIO
EMAIL

Chris Angeloni

Graduate Student, Psychology

BIO
EMAIL

Aaron Williams

Graduate Student, Neuroscience

BIO
EMAIL

Solymar Rolon Martinez

Graduate student, Neuroscience

BIO
EMAIL

Xiaomao Ding

Graduate student, Neuroscience

BIO
EMAIL

Jared Collina

Graduate Student, Neuroscience

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EMAIL

Tyler Ling

Research Technician

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Gabrielle Samulewicz

Research Technician

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EMAIL

COLLABORATORS

At Penn, we are part of the Hearing Research Center, Computational Neuroscience Institute and MindCore, and have extensive collaborations across departments. We collaborate with Dr. Yale CohenDr. Danielle BassettDr. Konrad KordingDr. Jay GottfriedDr. Steve EliadesDr. Josh Gold, Dr. Marc Fuccillo, Dr. Mariella di Biasi, Dr. Ethan Goldberg.

We also collaborate with researchers across the world, including Dr. Claudia Clopath (Imperial College London), Dr. Judit Gervain (University of Padua), Dr. Ann Hermundstadt (Janelia HHMI), Dr. Wiktor Mlynarski (IST), Dr. Dean Buonomano (UCLA) and Dr. Julie Haas (Lehigh University).

BIOS

Maria Neimark Geffen, Ph.D. she/her

Associate Professor

Departments of Otorhinolaryngology, Neuroscience, and Neurology

University of Pennsylvania

Email

download C.V.

B.A. Princeton University (2001) Molecular Biology, minors in Biophysics and Visual Arts 
Ph.D. Harvard University (2006) Biophysics

Dr. Geffen is a leader in the field of auditory neuroscience. She is interested in the way the brain encodes information about the world and how our perception is shaped by our emotional state and experience. She combines computational and biological approaches to study the mechanisms behind dynamic auditory perception, memory and learning.

Dr. Geffen first became interested in systems neuroscience through her undergraduate thesis under mentorship of John Hopfield at Princeton University, in which she explored the mechanics of whisking in rats. She studied texture encoding in the somatosensory system with Christopher Moore at MIT during her first two years of graduate school at Harvard.  She completed her Ph.D. in the laboratory of Markus Meister at Harvard University, where she discovered a novel retinal circuit for processing moving images. After her Ph.D., she was a fellow at the Center for Physics and Biology at Rockefeller University, where she worked under mentorship of Dr. Marcelo Magnasco, exploring the dynamics of natural sounds.

Dr. Geffen has been directing the Laboratory for Auditory Coding at the University of Pennsylvania since 2010. She was promoted to Associate Professor in 2018. Dr. Geffen’s recent discoveries include: identifying a novel cell type that supports hearing of unexpected sounds; establishing the connection between emotional learning and sound perceptual acuity; and elucidating the neuronal code for representation of communication signals in the brain. Her scientific results are regularly published in well-recognized journals, including Nature Neuroscience, eLife and PLoS Biology. Her research accomplishments have been recognized with prestigious awards, including the Burroughs Wellcome Career Award at the Scientific Interface, the Klingenstein Foundation Award in Neurosciences, the Human Frontiers in Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, the Auditory Neurophysiology Young Investigator Spotlight Award and the Kaufman Foundation New Initiative Grant. Her research is supported by multiple grants from the NIH, including NIDCD and the BRAIN Initiative, as well as by private and international foundations. She serves as a permanent member on an NIH review panel, and has served as the general chair and workshop director for multiple national and international meetings. She currently serves as a co-director of the Cajal Course in Computational Neuroscience, and an organizer of the E.A.R.S. seminar series. Dr. Geffen is a dedicated mentor and her trainees have won the Brain Research Foundation Young Investigator Award, multiple Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards from the NIH and the Saul Winegrad Award for Outstanding Dissertation.

Katherine C. Wood, Ph.D.

Post-doctoral Fellow

Ph.D. University College London, Neuroscience 2015

M.Sc. University College London, 2010

MBiochem Oxford University, 2006

Dr. Wood studies how the auditory cortex supports learning. She uses two-photon imaging to record neural activity from hundreds of neurons simultaneously, tracking the same cells over many days throughout the course of learning. In particular, she studies differential auditory fear conditioning, during which a mouse is presented with two sounds, one of which is paired with a foot-shock. Following conditioning, mice learn with varying degrees of specificity to discriminate between the two sounds. Dr. Wood found that the activity in auditory cortex is able to predict the specificity with which mice learn to discriminate between the two stimuli. 

As an undergraduate Dr. Wood studied Biochemistry at Oxford University. Dr. Wood spent a few years after her degree working in London in various different roles before she decided that she wanted to be in academia. Dr. Wood went back to university to study for an MSc in Neuroscience at UCL after which she undertook her PhD there in the lab of Jennifer Bizley. In her PhD, Dr. Wood investigated how the auditory cortex of ferrets encodes the spatial location of sounds. She moved to the Geffen lab in early 2016.

Melanie Tobin, Ph.D. she/her

Post-doctoral Fellow

Ph.D. Institut Curie, Paris, 2016

Master 2 ENS Ulm, Paris, 2012

License and Master 1 in Physics, ENS Cachan, 2011

Dr. Tobin is a postdoc in the lab and arrived in January 2018. She studies how neural networks process sounds in Auditory Cortex, and more particularly the role of interneurons within these networks. She uses two-photon imaging in the mouse Auditory Cortex to record neural activity from hundreds of cells at a time and combine this with optogenetic stimulation of subtypes of interneurons. She can then compare how the network’s response to a sound stimulus changes when subtypes of interneurons are optogenetically activated, looking from a single-cell scale to the network scale. Dr. Tobin’s background is in Physics, which she studied at ENS Cachan in France, and she then continued on to a PhD in Biophysics on the mechanical properties of mammalian hair cells at the Curie Institute in Paris. Outside of the lab Dr. Tobin’s main activities are dancing, playing music, exploring and socializing, and her less common activities are arts and crafts, hiking and eating cheese.

Alexandria Lesicko, Ph.D.

Post-doctoral Fellow

Ph.D. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Neuroscience 2018

B.S. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Molecular and Cellular Biology 2012

Dr. Lesicko is interested in deviance detection and multisensory processing in the auditory midbrain, or inferior colliculus. She uses optogenetics and in vivo electrophysiology to determine how projections from the auditory cortex affect metrics of deviance detection in the inferior colliculus. She has found that input from the auditory cortex regulates processing of both repetition and prediction cues in the inferior colliculus. She has also received funding from the BRAIN Initiative to study how auditory and somato-motor information are encoded in the inferior colliculus using a combination of two-photon imaging, behavior, and network analysis techniques. She completed both her Bachelor’s degree (Molecular and Cellular Biology) and PhD (Neuroscience) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she studied modularity in the multisensory inputs and local connections of the inferior colliculus with Dr. Daniel Llano. She is one of the co-organizers of the EARS seminar series. Outside of the lab, she enjoys singing in an a cappella group, playing piano and guitar, cooking, and yoga.

Nathan Vogler, Ph.D.

Post-doctoral Fellow

Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, 2020 Neuroscience

B.A.University of Pittsburgh, 2014 Neuroscience and History & Philosophy of Science

Dr. Vogler studies the brain circuits that mediate learning and flexible behaviors during auditory categorization, focusing on cortico-striatal feedback loops between the auditory cortex and basal ganglia. Specifically, he uses intersectional viral tracing strategies to map these circuits, and two-photon imaging to track neuronal responses during learning of an auditory categorization task. Also, through a collaboration with the Gottfried laboratory, he studies the neural mechanisms of cross-modal auditory-olfactory integration, using a combination of anatomical tracing, behavior, and in vivo electrophysiology. As an undergraduate at the University of Pittsburgh, he studied Neuroscience and History & Philosophy of Science. He received his PhD in Neurobiology from the University of Pittsburgh, studying experience-dependent plasticity of synaptic zinc signaling in the auditory brainstem. He began working in the Geffen Lab in spring 2020. Outside of the lab, he enjoys cooking, eating, and playing music.

Janaki Sheth, Ph.D.

Post-doctoral Fellow

Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles, Physics, 2020

B. Tech, 2014 Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay

Dr. Sheth is a new postdoc in the lab, having joined in September 2020. She studies the role of inhibitory neurons in auditory learning using computational methods, in particular bayesian modelling and dynamical systems analysis. Dr. Sheth did her undergraduate studies at the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay where she majored in Engineering Physics and minored in Electrical Engineering. Dr. Sheth’s interest in Physics led her to pursue a PhD at UCLA where she investigated the behaviour of the hair cells of the inner ear using ideas from nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. Her growing interest in the auditory system has since brought her to the Geffen lab. Dr. Sheth’s hobbies include hiking, biking, running, dancing and cooking new recipes. 

Personal page

Linda Garami, Ph.D.

Post-doctoral Fellow

Ph.D. Eovos Lorand University, Budapest, 2016

Masters cognitive psychology, Eotvos Lorand University, 2010

Dr. Garami is studying the neuronal code for regularity and violations of expectation in audition. She uses in vivo electrophysiology to record from neurons in the auditory cortex. Varying the stimulus statistics she tests how the AC adapts to predictable environment and processes auditory patterns of different complexity. Her background is in cognitive neuroscience, she tested infants’ language acquisition using EEG as a graduate student at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, then speech in noise processing and short-term auditory memory in older adults in Toronto under the supervision of Dr Claude Alan. Her motivation for switching to animal models was the better localization capacity, that is essential to better understand the contribution of AC to complex auditory stimulus processing. Her interest includes identifying the similarities and overlap between the mechanisms of auditory and visual pattern processing and sensory generative models. Dr. Garami is wrapping up her project in the lab as she is developing a computational sensory project at the Central European University.

Christopher Angeloni

Ph.D. student, Psychology Graduate Group

B.S. Lafayette College, 2012, Neuroscience

Chris’s  thesis work focuses on how efficient codes in the auditory cortex affect how we hear sounds. More specifically, Chris is studying a form of efficient neural adaptation to acoustic variability, called contrast gain control, and testing how this phenomenon alters the way mice hear sounds in noise. To get at these questions, he uses a combination of operant behaviors, chronic and acute electrophysiology, computational modelling, and various methods for causally manipulating neural activity. Chris became interested in neuroscience during my undergraduate years at Lafayette College, where he majored in Neuroscience (BS) and Art (BA) and studied non-invasive brain-computer interface technologies. He  then expanded my experimental skills as a research assistant in Frank Tong’s visual neuroscience lab at Vanderbilt University, before coming to UPenn for graduate school. In his free time, he makes artbeer and ride/work on bikes. 

Personal Webpage.

Aaron Williams

M.D.-Ph.D. student, Neuroscience Graduate Group

B.A.  Stanford University, 2015, Human Biology

Aaron is an MD-PhD student the lab, doing his thesis work on audiovisual integration. Specifically, he uses electrophysiology to study how the primary sensory cortices respond to simultaneous audiovisual cues, and uses optogenetic and tracing techniques to understand the circuits that support this process. After medical school, Aaron is  interested in specializing in neurology. He is originally from Virginia, and he went to Stanford for undergrad. Outside of lab he likes to play basketball and chess.

Solymar Rolon Martinez

Ph.D. student, Neuroscience Graduate Group

B.S., M.S. University of Puerto Rico, 2012, Biomedical Sciences and Anatomy

Solymar is studying the role of amygdala-thalamic projections in auditory behavior.

Xiaomao Ding

Ph.D. student, Neuroscience Graduate Group

B.S. University of Pennsylvania, 2017

Xiaomao studies how temporal patterns in sound affect auditory processing. Specifically, he studies how regularity in an auditory scene affects the neural representation of novel sounds. He uses a combination of electrophysiology during mice performing an operant task and 2-photon imaging in mice during passive listening. Xiaomao also attended Penn as an undergrad where he majored in Biochemistry and Computer Science.

Jared Collina

Ph.D. student, Neuroscience Graduate Group

B.S. Haverford College, 2018, Physics

Jared is a PhD student in Neuroscience who joined the lab in Fall 2019. His work in the lab focuses on the neuronal circuits for hearing under uncertainty. His first experience with the intersection of physics and neuroscience was as an intern with Dr. Ian Krajbich at The Ohio State University, where he used computational models of human decision-making. He made the step to experimental neuroscience during his graduate studies. In his free time, he enjoys soccer, tennis, video games and board games… well, games in general.

 

Tyler Ling

Research Technician

B.A. University of Pennsylvania, Neuroscience 2018

Tyler graduated from UPenn in 2018 where he majored in Neuroscience (BA). He is currently working on a collaborative project with Dr. Gottfried’s lab to explore the neuronal mechanisms for auditory-olfactory integration. He is currently in the process of applying to graduate school, pursuing a PhD in neuroscience. He is originally from San Francisco and enjoys taking his dog on hikes. Outside of lab, he likes to paint, watch anime, and working out.

Publications:
1. Liberini, C.G., Ghidewon, M., Ling, T. et al (2020). Early life overnutrition impairs plasticity of nonneuronal brainstem cells and drives obesity in offspring across development in rats. Int J Obes. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41366-020-00658-5https://www.nature.com/articles/s41366-020-00658-5

2. Liberini, C. G., Lhamo, R., Ghidewon, M., Ling, T., Juntereal, N., Chen, J., Cao, A., Stein, L. M., & Hayes, M. R. (2019). Liraglutide pharmacotherapy reduces body weight and improves glycemic control in juvenile obese/hyperglycaemic male and female rats. Diabetes, obesity & metabolism, 21(4), 866– 875. https://doi.org/10.1111/dom.13591https://dom-pubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/dom.13591

3. Liberini, C.G., Koch-Laskowski, K., Shaulson, E., McGrath, L.E., Lipsky, R.K., Lhamo, R., Ghideon, M., Ling, T., Stein, L.M., & Hayes., M.R. (2019). Combined Amylin/GLP-1 pharmacotherapy to promote and sustain long-lasting weight loss. Sci Rep 9, 8447. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44591-8  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-44591-8

Gabrielle Samulewicz

Research Technician

B.S. Syracuse University, 2020, Neuroscience and Psychology

Gabrielle graduated from Syracuse University in 2020 with degrees in Neuroscience and Psychology.  She is currently working with Aaron Williams, studying the neuronal mechanisms for auditory-visual integration in the brain.  Outside of the lab, Gabrielle enjoys cycling, hiking, and cooking.